Posts Tagged ‘honey pot pale ale’

Brewed: Honey Pot Pale Ale – Cascade Wet Hop

Friday, September 2nd, 2016
2016 Cascade hop harvest.

2016 Cascade hop harvest.

I have brewed with home grown hops in the past. I didn’t really care for the finished product, so much so that I didn’t even make an entry into the blog. I recall heaps of vegetal taste that had been extracted into the beer. Unpleasant at best.

That first, and only attempt, I used the hops as late kettle additions: 20, 10 and 1 minute. I wanted to extract cascade flavor and aroma. Unfortunately, I only remember the greenness. That one brew has scared me away from using my home grown hops since.

In the meantime, I have dug up two of the plants (Mt. Hood and Centennial) leaving me with Cascade and Willamette. The two plants I dug up were do to low yield due to poor yard placement. The remaining two have produced okay crops but I have always come up with a reason or three, to the wife and quietly to myself, on why I didn’t have time and/or couldn’t use the hops in a particular season.

This season I noticed that I was getting a good crop of both Cascade and Willamette. I had to do something with those hops. I needed to gain merit with my wife for not wanting to dig up the last two plants. She would replace them with flowers in a heart beat.

What to brew and how to use the hops were my biggest and only questions. Trying to coordinate an optimal time to pick and have time to brew was up there as well.

Countless of hours of thinking about brewing while on one of my two daily walks yielded:

  1. Brew a beer my wife likes: honey pot pale ale.
  2. Incorporate the hops as a whirlpool addition to the wife beer: whirlpool hops.
  3. Need time: Labor day weekend.

I had come up with the perfect plan. Now I only had to perform. Never an issue.

2016 Willamette hop harvest.

2016 Willamette hop harvest.

On brew day, I picked the Cascade and Willamette hops. The amount of Cascade filled a 6 gallon bucket half way. I have no idea how much it weighed but I know it was a shit-ton of hops. The Cascade was full of hop oils and huge on aroma: my hands were green but had the aroma of fresh cascade hops. Better than any crop previously. Knowing that wet hopping with that amount of hops would soak up huge amounts of wort, I decided to not use the Willamette. RIP Willamette. It was discarded. Next year I will plan Labor day weekend as a double brew weekend to use up all the home grown hops. The second beer I would brew: a saison, using the Willamette hops late in the boil and/or as a whirlpool hop.

If the beer tastes half as good as it smelled while brewing, this will be a winner, even with the wife. Enjoy!

Honey Pot Pale Ale

General Information:
Brew Date: Friday, September 02, 2016
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S-05
Yeast Starter: none
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.050
IBU: 31.5
Color: 6.4 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 6.2%
Primary Fermentation: 14 days @68*F

Grain Bill:
6.50# 2 Row
0.50# Caramel 40L
0.50# Honey Malt
2.50# Virginia Orange Blossom Honey

Mash:
Saccharification @150.8*F

Hop Bill:
1.00 ounce 2014 Magnum @60 minutes
1.00 ounce 2015 Cascade @10 minutes

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 minutes
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 minutes

Update(s):

  • 2016-09-03: @0700 the temperature was at 68*F, pitched yeast
  • 2016-09-04: @69*F, fermenting well.
  • 2016-09-06: Fermentation slowing, @67*F, add heat @ 68*F.
  • 2016-09-08: Took of heat. Left at ambient basement temperature.
  • 2016-09-17: Bottled with 3.5 ounces of priming sugar and 2.0 cups of water. 24, 22 ounce bottles. Bottle crown label: HPW.

Useless Fact: Trees “talk” by exchanging chemicals. They communicate through underground fungi, and when they can recognize their relatives, they share nutrients. Basically, tree “families” help each other out.

Brewed: Honey Pot Pale Ale

Wednesday, November 25th, 2015
Sun hitting the honey jars just right.

Sun hitting the honey jars just right.

A couple of first happened with this home brewing session of Honey Pot pale ale:

  • Used two different types of honey
  • used melonoidin malt instead of honey malt

You can see by the picture to the right that the honeys are not exactly the same. The one on the left is cheap store bought honey. The other is honey my wife picked up while on a visit to Michigan this summer. The Michigan honey is light in color but huge on aroma and flavor. Floral. This honey is by far has the biggest characteristics of any honey I have ever had the joy of using in home brewing. Curious as to how much will make the final bottled product.

The other change, malt, was minor. From my research, supposedly this malt is similar based on what the maltster reports.

I don’t think this change has as much a chance to impact the beer like the honey. Tasting notes by the end of December. Enjoy!

Updates:

  • 2015-11-26: Fermenting nicely at 68*F.

Useless Fact: Like fingerprints, everyone’s tongue print is different!

Brewed: Honey Pot Pale Ale

Monday, March 23rd, 2015

crushed grain

It has been almost two years since I last brewed up a batch of Honey Pot Pale Ale. This is one of those beers that is for my wife. She purchased the honey over the holidays and has been asking me to brew up a batch since that time (and probably before). I couldn’t keep telling her no any longer. I picked up a packet of S-05, honey malt, and crystal 40. Of course I tweaked the recipe a bit more to my liking: dropping the 0.5 ounce of Fuggles, while upping the Amarillo addition to an ounce from a half-ounce. My wife is coming around on hops, so this should be an acceptable change.

Last week I brewed an IPA named Clash of Hops. The efficiency of that batch was a bit lower than I would have expected. The setting on my mill was right were I had set it: 0.35 mm (or is that 0.035 mm). While reading a post on homebrewtalk.com for some other reason than efficiency, I noticed a reponse that said their mill was set at 0.2 mm, with immediate increase in efficiency. The writing was on the wall: tighten up the gap to 0.31 mm.

wort from first inital sparge

The change increased efficiency greatly over that last Honey Pot Pale Ale brew day. I didn’t have any issues with a stuck sparge either (why I only cranked it to 0.31 mm). There is a chance I will crank it down a bit more but I am worried about some of the home brews in which I use a heavier dose of wheat in. I might continuously tighten the mill by 0.01 mm until I get to the point of ease of sparging diminishing.

This beer should be ready, in the bottle, by mid-April, just in time for that hopeful first stretch of warm weather. Enjoy!

General Information:
Brew Date: Sunday, March 22, 2015
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S-05
Yeast Starter: none
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.062
IBU: 31.5
Color: 6.4 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 6.7%
Primary Fermentation: 14 days @68*F

Grain Bill:
6.50# 2 Row
0.50# Caramel 40L
0.50# Honey Malt
2.50# Local Honey

Mash:
Saccharification @153.6*F

Hop Bill:
1.00 ounce Amarillo @60 minutes
1.00 ounce Centennial @60 minutes

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 minutes
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 minutes

Update(s):

  • 2015-03-22: Fermentation beginning to slow, upped temperature to 70.0*F.
  • 2015-03-28: Took of heat. Left at ambient basement temperature.
  • 2015-04-19: Bottled with 4.0 ounces priming sugar and 2.0 cups of water. Gravity at 1.002.

Useless Fact: A cow gives nearly 200,000 glasses of milk in her lifetime.

Brewed: Honey Pot Pale Ale

Monday, July 22nd, 2013
The new, to me, Blichmann 15 gallon kettle

The new, to me, Blichmann 15 gallon kettle

I have always said that brewing equipment doesn’t make the brewer. I still believe that but having some kick ass equipment does make the brewing day easier. The latest addition to my equipment portfolio is a 15 gallon Blichmann kettle.

After brewing Honey Pot Pale Ale for my wife as the inaugural brew with the new kettle, I determined a couple of points that made my brewing life easier:

  1. The larger volume of the kettle allows me to not worry about the heat break as the wort comes up to boil. I have had several boil overs in my days of the 10 gallon kettle, having to watch it closely every time the wort was nearing boil
  2. The kettle has a built in thermometer. At this point good and bad (see below).
  3. The kettle has a built in spigot. This point has turned out to be awesome. I don’t have to hold a racking cane, I don’t have to carry the kettle, full of wort, to a spot to allow me to drain, I don’t have to watch it that closely.

Outside of all the gloriousness of the kettle, there is one point of frustration: the temperature probe is at the 7 gallon mark. Since I brew 5.5 gallon batches, that is at the top end of the amount of wort I have in the pot. This means that I have had to attach another thermometer to the immersion chiller to have an accurate reading while chilling the beer post boil. Not ideal.

The brew day of the Honey Pale Ale went okay. I didn’t hit my mash temperature. I have thoughts on that one but I will wait until I try out the beer. Enjoy!

General Information:
Brew Date: Sunday, July 21, 2013
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S05
Yeast Starter: none
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.048
IBU: 31.5
Color: 6.4 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 6.7%
Primary Fermentation: 14 days @68*F

Grain Bill:
6.50# 2 Row
0.50# Caramel 40L
0.50# Honey Malt
0.25# Rice Hull
2.50# Local Honey

Mash:
Saccharification @148.6*F

Hop Bill:
0.50 ounces Amarillo @60 minutes
0.50 ounces Fuggles @60 minutes
1.00 ounces Centennial @60 minutes

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 minutes
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 minutes

Updates:

  • 2013-08-10: bottled with 4.0 ounces of priming sugar, 2 cups of water. Yielded 1, 750ml, 26, 22 ounce. Gravity at 1.004
  • 2013-09-13: tasted

Useless Fact: The “spot” on the 7-Up logo comes from its inventor who had red eyes. He was an albino.

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