Posts Tagged ‘home brew’

Tasted: TNBC One

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014
tnbc one

Bad pour, the beer wasn’t over carbonated.

Almost two months ago, I brewed the inaugural TNBC beer: TNBC One. It was to celebrate the last several plus years of friends getting together to share in American craft beer and home brews.

Unfortunately our schedules haven’t worked out and I have been “stuck” with 5 gallons of home brewed DIPA. I have been appreciating the beer for the better part of a month. The beer has developed, mellowing from both the hop and malt end, creating a more well balanced beer. Definitely not perfect…

Look: Slightly cloudy. Could be chill haze from proteins as I didn’t use Irish moss. Typical orange/gold color of most of my recent IPA offerings. The head is thick, frothing up as it recedes, leaving a sticky, web-like lacing behind

Aroma: Lots of hops. Citrus, floral and abundant. The malt is a bit more pronounced than expected: bread/biscuit.

Taste: The citrus and floral hops are muddled together. Neither is clear but believe that is assisted by the amber malt, confusing the palate by adding a huge mix of biscuity flavors.

Drinkability: Medium or better body but lower carbonation than I would have liked (in spite of the huge amount of head). Dry finish. Alcohol is not evident.

Overall: The hops are fantastic. The combination of the Citra, Amarillo and hopping techniques created a huge amount of flavor and aroma. In spite of this, the amber malt lends too much malt profile, bringing down the joyous celebration of hops.

I would brew the beer again but drop the amber malt down a few notches; 8 ounces at most. After the re-brew, I would check to see the brightness of the hop profile to see if that needed tweaking as well. Enjoy!

Useless Fact: During the time of Peter the Great, any Russian man who wore a beard was required to pay a special tax.

Home Brew Pot Licker Milk Stout Cocoa and Jalapeno (365 Day 334)

Monday, October 31st, 2011

home brew

While home brewing I always feel the experience is made better with a few home brews. Rich found his way over in the middle of the boil, so we started out with a bomber of Autumn Sun.

Next, after we racked the beer to the carboy and pitched some yeast, I opened up some Pot Licker Milk Stout that I had put on cocoa nibs. Per usual the beer hadn’t carbonated in the two weeks since bottling, so we had to endure a partially flat edition. Cocoa was evident and, in this early version, seemed to be perfectly balanced.

The last bottle was another twelve ounces of Pot Licker Milk Stout but this bottle was aged on cocoa and roasted jalapeno. Since I used the same amount of cocoa nibs that I used in the other, the chocolate was spot on. The jalapeno was a flavor addition but it only came through vaguely.

On the next go around I will add a bit more roasted jalapeno to up the amount of roastiness and hopefully add just a touch of a bite. Enjoy!

Useless Fact: Franklin D. Roosevelt, the most popular president ever to hold office in the United States, did not carry his home of county of Dutchess, New York, in any of his four elections.

Beer and Dinner (365 Day 325)

Saturday, October 22nd, 2011

I have to start off by saying thank you to my in-laws for purchasing tickets to a beer/dinner event in which they included Rich and his wife along with my wife and myself. Completely unnecessary but 110% appreciated and enjoyed by all.

This happened to be my first beer dinner (sort of hard with three young kids). I didn’t know what to expect but had thoughts from the different blogs I have read about other people’s experiences.

I have to say my expectation was a bit different than the actual experience.

There is one main reason for this: the American craft beer was provided by a set of local home brewers that have aspirations to become full time brewers. The provided four beers, in my opinion, as three of the actual six where just a tripel that they played around with: tripel, tripel on french oak, tripel on french oak and bourbon. They also had a wit, porter, and rye/wheat pale ale.

My favorite of the six beers was the tripel on french oak. I would probably rate it around a low to mid range seven. The rest were varying degrees of beers that didn’t agree with me. The porter, which was aged on ancho chili (I believe powder) and pomegranate, was just overwhelmingly on the chili side. The last sip I took almost made me gag on chili and it also made me sweat.

I look forward to another beer dinner but I will make sure it is by professional brewers in the future. Enjoy!

Useless Fact: If you fart constantly for 6 years, 9 months and 23 days you would produce enough gas to explode an atomic bomb.

Home Brew Autumn Sun Amber Ale (365 Day 313)

Monday, October 10th, 2011

The last day of the great American home brew drinking weekend. I am proud to say for the first time ever, anyone and everyone that ventured over to my house for the weekend festivities drank my home brew. No one threw up either, which is an added bonus.

I had four of my beers ready to go:

  • Fairway Cut – a wheat beer brewed with coriander and orange zest
  • Honey Pot – a honey pale ale brewed with three pounds of honey
  • Dirty Balls – a Cascadian dark ale with a pleasant hop profile
  • Autumn Sun – an amber ale over hopped to my liking and American craft beer number 313

Autumn Sun is my new favorite home brew, taking the place of Dirty Balls. This is the first time I brewed it and I don’t know if I would change much: maybe a 90 minute boil next time to see how the malt profile might change. Just a touch of dark malt high lights the big, caramel grain bill with Chinook and Cascade hops balancing, leaving a bit of bitterness in the finish. Easy to drink and darn tasty.

I don’t like my own beers all that often so this is a good feeling. I will probably be posting recipes in the future as well as I am looking into Belgian and sour beers to come next. I will continue to make the four staples while looking for a few others to throw in. I have a milk stout ready to bottle tomorrow. Enjoy!

Useless Fact: Having sex can reduce a fever because of the sweat produced.

Home Brew Dirty Balls Cascadian Dark Ale (365 Day 312)

Sunday, October 9th, 2011

Day two of the weekend of home brew. This time around it is Dirty Balls Cascadian Dark Ale. If Cascadian dark ale doesn’t ring a bell, some call it a Black IPA. In my opinion there is no such thing as a Black IPA. An American and English IPA have a defined style guidelines that do not include the color being dark. So stop yourself before you call for it by an incorrect name. Cascadian Dark Ale.

Dirty Balls is named for having to wash a member’s golf ball on the green or before the next tee off: golf balls get dirty. Get your damn mind out of the gutter.

Since Cascadian dark ales are synonymous with hops, this one has its fair share and then some. Almost 100 IBUs (International Bitter Units), Dirty Balls doesn’t have a bitter bite but has a ton of pine, citrus, and tropical fruit aroma and flavor from the hops. Simcoe, Centenial, Citra, and Amarillo all make their mark while Warrior makes for the clean and non-lingering bitterness.

I am usually harsh on my beer but probably the second best beer I brew next to the beer I will have tomorrow: new favorite 🙂 Enjoy!

Useless Fact: Cracking your knuckles does not actually hurt your bones or cause arthritis. The sound you hear is just gas bubbles bursting.

Fairway Cut Hefeweizen Home Brew

Saturday, July 31st, 2010

Three months seems like a long time up front, but time has flown by and that is how long it has been since I had the chance to brew at home. I guess I might have been a little burnt out too. I had brewed a crazy amount in a short period, having something to do with beer most weekends in spite of having other obligations to attend to.

I had my mind on several different styles of beer: wheat (the one my wife likes as it is getting low), ipa (brewed before but was going to add some Citra hop to the dry hop), or a hefeweizen. You can tell by the title which one of these styles won out.

Why a Hefe? Glad you asked. It is probably my favorite style of beer when down well. I have done a lot of research on them and came to the conclusion that I should ferment this at 62 degrees. Also, since my past beers have been a bit thin, I decided to make a smaller batch of beer but do a full boil.

A Hefe recipe is rather simple, especially when using extract. The trick is in the temperature of the fermentation as all the real flavor and aroma comes from the yeast. Wheat malt extract and Hallertau hops are the ingredients: no steeped grains at all.

The beer has already been fermenting for a week as I brewed this last Saturday. I am considering bottling after two weeks but I think I will let it go my customary four weeks. I can’t wait to taste and see if I hit a winner. Enjoy!

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