Posts Tagged ‘brett backspin belgian pale ale’

Brewed: Brett Backspin Belgian Pale Ale

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013
Bad grain crush due to putting the drill in reverse.

Bad grain crush due to putting the drill in reverse.

After having the last bottle of the first batch of Brett Backspin Belgian Pale Ale about 45 days ago, I kept kicking myself in the rear for not brewing again before batch one was no more. I didn’t think that far ahead. Time to brew round two but how to make it better?

For the aforementioned 45 days before the brew day I ran scenarios through my head on to make this round a bit different but not stray too far away from the original. One simple solution: add Brettanomyces lambicus to the Brettanomyces claussenii that I used last time.

I created two 1 liter starters for each of the Brett strains. For the first time I tried using a flask for one of the starters. Once I started to chill the starter it became apparent that the flask wasn’t go to cool off as easy as my typical kitchen pot. I don’t use thermometers for starters as I have always been a good gauge of temperature. The flask changed everything. I don’t think I ever got the temperature down and the yeast never took off. I decided to forgo the Brett lambicus on brew day. At least I should have another good Brett beer to last me.

Wrong!

I milled the grains in a hurry. Chuck was over and wanted the mill back. I grabbed the mill, weighed the grains and brought it all outside with the drill. Unfortunately I didn’t realize the drill was in reverse. I figured it still rotated, didn’t check the grain, assuming that it should have been cracked. About 50% of the grain was milled in this fashion. Dumb ass. On brew day, as I poured the grain into the mash tun, I noticed that half of the grain kernels weren’t cracked. Crap. I kept with the schedule, doing everything as planned. The aroma was great but the efficiency, as expected suffered (see below).

I only have a couple of months to wait to see if this beer turns out. I think it will but when I rack to secondary I am going to grab some of the yeast and brew again. I should write a book: Brew Like A Moron. I have an enormous repertoire and skills in the subject matter. Enjoy!

General Information:
Brew Date: Sunday, April 07, 2013
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: Brettanomyces classenii
Yeast Starter: 1 liter
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.00
Original Gravity: 1.039
IBU: 25.3
Color: 7.0 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 90
Brewhouse Efficiency: HORRIBLE
Alcohol by Volume: 4.0%
Primary Fermentation: 28 days @68*F
Secondary Fermentation: 120 days @68*F

Grain Bill:
9.50# Pilsner
1.00# Munich
0.25# Caramunch
0.25# Aromatic

Mash:
Saccharification Rest @ 153.3*F for 60 minutes.

Hop Bill:
1.50 ounces Fuggles (4.5%) @90 minutes
0.50 ounces Fuggles (4.5%) @15 minutes

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 min.
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 min.

Useless Fact: American Airlines saved $40,000 in 1987 by eliminating one olive from each salad served in first-class.

Last Bottle: Brett Backspin Belgian Pale Ale

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

brett backspin belgian pale ale

In my short home brewing career (four years) many beers have come and gone without much fanfare. The last bottle of most beers wasn’t much of of a thought and, in some cases, didn’t come quick enough. Heck, I think I have some bottles of two year old IPA.

Why should Brett Backspin be any different? Simply it is my favorite beer that I have ever brewed. I had to pay hommage to the beer as well as compare notes from seven months ago.

Look: Not much as changed from the original look of this beer. Worth noting that is it extremely clear. Original notes: Clear accents the golden hue with a pure white lacing that doesn’t have depth or staying power. Lacing is sporadic, mildly dotting the glass throughout.

Aroma: Green grape/white wine and pear have become much more dominant; still extremely pleasant. Different from “regular” yeast and so much more rewarding. Original notes: Delicate. Complex. Gentle white wine permeates along with pleasing yet docile pear accent. Laid back grain scents add a backbone to the aroma.

Taste: Similar to the nose that both Brett characteristics have picked it up a notch. Amazingly they are still harmonious with each other. Orginal notes: The white wine (green grape but w/ alcohol maybe) greets first, stemming from the nose. Carries throughout the beer. Pear picks it up a notch, creating more of balancing act. Fragile. Grains again show here.

Drinkability: Very refreshing, especially in the summer months but a cold winter day didn’t hinder the enjoyment. Dries the palate. Original notes: Light body without a question. Carbonation adds a nice elegance to the beer. One of the few times I have dialed it in well.

Overall: This beer was fantastic. I hate that this was my last bottle. So good when young but awesome at this point in time. Going to be brewed again soon. One I need to have a bottle of in the cellar all the time! Original notes: The Brett is there but not as pronounced as I would have liked. But as I continue mull this beer over, maybe that isn’t a bad thing. A delicate, yet complex beer has its place. The body is very light. After hearing an interview with Chad Yakobson, I might have to throw some oats in the next batch to hold up the body. That said, this is one light, easy drinking beer.

Useless Fact: The reason firehouses have circular stairways is from the days of yore when the engines were pulled by horses. The horses were stabled on the ground floor and figured out how to walk up straight staircases.

Brett Backspin Belgian Pale Ale Tasting

Wednesday, August 1st, 2012

brettanomyces backspin belgian pale ale

Just like the past few tasting, a tasting of Brett Backspin Belgian Pale Ale has been a long time coming. Brewed back in February of this year, Brett Backspin sat in the carboy for two months and now has been bottled for three months. This was the first beer that I fermented a beer 100% on Brett. I asked a bunch of questions and read a lot of information (typical of my logical self, drives me nuts that I never “wing” something) before this endeavor. The hardest part is wondering what is going in the carboy while waiting, what seems to be an eternity, for the beer to finish.

Some things I noticed:

  • I used a started which allowed the Brett to get off to a good start within 24 hours of pitching the yeast.
  • There was a nice inch of krausen during high fermentation.
  • The beer finished very clean, probably do to the long bright tank period that was needed to allow the yeast to finish.

Look: Clear accents the golden hue with a pure white lacing that doesn’t have depth or staying power. Lacing is sporadic, mildly dotting the glass throughout.

Aroma: Delicate. Complex. Gentle white wine permeates along with pleasing yet docile pear accent. Laid back grain scents add a backbone to the aroma.

Taste: The white wine (green grape but w/ alcohol maybe) greets first, stemming from the nose. Carries throughout the beer. Pear picks it up a notch, creating more of balancing act. Fragile. Grains again show here.

Drinkability: Light body without a question. Carbonation adds a nice elegance to the beer. One of the few times I have dialed it in well.

Overall: The Brett is there but not as pronounced as I would have liked. But as I continue mull this beer over, maybe that isn’t a bad thing. A delicate, yet complex beer has its place. The body is very light. After hearing an interview with Chad Yakobson, I might have to throw some oats in the next batch to hold up the body. That said, this is one light, easy drinking beer.

The next steps here (including some research) will be to determine how to ramp up the Brett profile of the beer. I have to determine if under-pitching the yeast will do, if using one generation old Brett will add more aroma and flavor, if a higher temperature would allow the Brett to be more distinct, if a longer bright tank time is more important to the overall beer than being in the bottle, or if some combination is best. I will definitely only change one thing at a time, so this might take some time before I know the correct combination (more Brett beer to sample, yes!). Enjoy!

Useless Fact: More Monopoly money is printed in a year than real money throughout the world.

Brett Backspin Belgian Pale Ale Bottled

Tuesday, May 1st, 2012

backspin belgian pale ale

I am sick, again. Seems to be the theme of my life for the past six months. It has been a rough bout with just about every cold ailment imaginable. This series of ailments has also slowed down the progress on the home brewing front: I haven’t brewed but I am catching up with some aging beers.

Brett Backspin was brewed back in February as my second attempt attempt at a Belgian Pale Ale. The beer finished at 1.007, I realize it could maybe drop a bit more, but felt that 9 weeks at 68 degrees Fahrenheit was enough, I wanted to taste it. I did drink a bit of the beer that I used to pull the gravity. The beer is subtle, easy to drink, and carries an ABV of 5.7%. I can’t wait for carbonation to finish so that I can give it a real taste.

This was a long day of bottling because of how the dish washer works and not really paying attention to the setting for the dishes that were in there to start originally. I am trying to use this occasion to get the wife into allowing me to pick up some kegs and get started down that path.

Coming up: this weekend I am a bachelor and brewing both Saturday and Sunday. Enjoy!

Useless Fact: In 1221, Genghis Khan killed 1,748,000 people at Nishapur in one hour.

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