Archive for the ‘Home Brewing’ Category

Brewed: Kate the Great Clone

Friday, October 21st, 2016

brewing water heating for mash

Kate the Great is a legendary American craft beer in my book. It was a big, robust stout, released annually by Portsmouth Brewery. The only access I had to the beer was via trades. Matt, a great trading for years, was kind enough to send me back-to-back years of the beer. I had cellared them until recently. I am glad I waited as it was great to get reacquainted with such a fine lady.

I have been fortunate enough to taste Kate the Great on two different occasions:

  • The first, a Tuesday night beer club bottle share in February 2010.
  • The second, a Thursday night beer club get together in the last few months when I attempted to do a mini vertical of the last two years the beer was released.

That first time was magical and I set out to get at least a bottle of my own. Eventually I stored up three bottles; one of those is still in the cellar. Maybe a treat if the Cubs win the World Series.

Formulating a Kate the Great Recipe

After having the beer the last time, I decided there was only one way to potentially taste the beer again: home brewing. Per typical, I turned to homebrewtalk.com for a clone recipe. Something this good had to have been sought out by the large home brewing community.

The huge thread still lingers on today with tons of great feedback. I decided to take the percentages in the first post as the gospel, creating a recipe to those specifications. The amount of dark malt, almost 3 pounds, is an absurd amount in home brewing career.

Home Brewing Kate the Great

Once again, just as I have been and, most recently with Baller IPA, my grain mill was pretty much useless. I had to dump grain at least 10 times to reset the mill as the non-driven roller continues to have a mind of it’s own, moving any which way it desires in spite of being locked down. Many of those times it bound up against the grain hopper, stopping the milling process completely. Frustrating, almost to the point of infuriating. My nine year old’s help was the only thing keeping me from blowing my stack. My efficiency suffered immensely, possibly the lowest percentage wise ever.

The gravity ended up some 20+ points lower than my brewing software predicted.

Outside of the milling process, the brew day went well. I am really taking to the Friday after work brew day. It leaves the rest of the weekend open for family time. Enjoy!

Note: I have reached out the the manufacturer of the mill. He has been very helpful in explaining what I should be able to do to stop my issues. More on this next brew day.

Recipe for Kate the Great

General Information:
Brew Date: Friday, October 21, 2016
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S-05 (1.8 – since the gravity was so low, should have been over 2), not hydrated
Yeast Starter: none
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.090
IBU: 69.9
Color: 63.9 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 90
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 11.8% (probably will be in the 10 range?)
Primary Fermentation: 30 days @68*F, condition at ambient basement temperature for two months

Grain Bill:
19.00# Maris Otter
1.00# Roasted Barley
1.00# Special B
14.0 ounces Red Wheat
12.0 ounces Black Patent
12.0 ounces Carafa III
8.00 ounces Flaked Oats
8.00 ounces Caramel 40L
8.00 ounces Aromatic
4.00 ounces Chocolate (Malt)
4.00 ounces Caramel 120L

Mash:
Saccharification @156.2*F

Hop Bill:
2.00 ounce 2014 Magnum @75 minutes
1.00 ounce 2015 Cascade @20 minutes
1.00 ounce 2015 Cascade @5 minutes

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 minutes
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 minutes
1.0 minute of pure oxygen after racking to carboy
8 quarts of rice hulls

Updates

  • 2016-10-22: slowly fermenting at 65.8*F.
  • 2016-10-23: morning – medium fermentation @68.1*F.
  • 2016-10-23: afternoon – hard fermentation @72.1*F.
  • 2016-10-24: morning – hard fermentation @72.6*F.
  • 2016-10-24: evening – medium fermentation @67.7*F. Added heat blanket set to 70.0*F.
  • 2016-10-26: reduced heat blanket temperature to 68.0*F.

Useless Fact: Ants can accidentally misinterpret the chemical trails left by other ants and start walking in circles. If too many members of the colony join in, it can kill the whole colony in what is sometimes known as the “Death Spiral”.

Tasted: Smiles IPA

Sunday, October 16th, 2016

home brew smiles ipa

I continue to stand by my claim that my sense of taste and aroma evolve as more potent version of India Pale Ales (IPAs) hit the craft beer market. This causes my perception of beers gone by to no longer have the same quality of impact. My home brewing is affected by these changed perceptions: I need to increase the hop profile, keeping my senses appetite satiated.

Smiles IPA was my second attempt at a Northeastern style IPA. I used a bit more varied malt profile and multiple type of hops as compared to Used. The hope was to push the hops to 11, allowing my lack of location to the Norther east, to not inhibit my ability to enjoy juicy, ripe IPAs.

The result…

Look: Pours cloudy with a half finger of white, loosely packed bubbled foam. Retention is meager for an IPA. Mildly effervescent.

Aroma: Big, juicy tropical hops abound.

Taste: Taste isn’t as big as the aroma. Tropical fruit is there, less instense. A little of the base malt comes through. Citrus.

Body:
A little on the thin side, only carried by the carbonation. Not oily in spite of the amount of oats. Dry finish.

Overall:
The aroma outshines the taste and, be far, is the best part of this beer. If I was to brew again, I would add more late kettle hops and probably some type of speciality grain to give it more malt character. Too neutral for me.

A better attempt at a Northeastern style IPA than Used. Getting closer but still missing something. Yeast? Hop process? Water profile? Enjoy!

Useless Fact: 93% of the Great Barrier Reef is now damaged by coral bleaching.

Brewed: Baller IPA

Thursday, October 6th, 2016
Over an 1.5 inches of trub after my first go around with dry hopping while active fermentation.

Over an 1.5 inches of trub after my first go around with dry hopping while active fermentation.

Home brewing beers that are named after family members has created an issue: now all my kids want a beer named after them. When the first kid (that I named a home brew after) brags to the other kids, a battle for Dad’s attention ensues. Since my oldest was the most exuberant, Baller IPA was named after her. As I mentioned before, when naming a beer I don’t typically give it the name of the real person but something that reminds me of that person. Thus, Baller IPA, is named due to my oldest child’s affinity for basketball. She plays hard, tough and with a determination that continues to soar in recent months.

Formulating Baller IPA Recipe

Baller IPA is another attempt at a Northeast style IPA (earlier attempts: Smiles and Used). The beer actually started out with intentions of being a double IPA, using some Northeast style hopping processes, while resuscitating an old, friendly on. Alas, it did not end up that way from the standpoint of gravity.

Cracking grain for me can be an adventure at times. The drill that drives my grinder doesn’t allow me to crack the grain as finely as I would like; the grinder binds as the drill doesn’t have the stones to push through the grain to the powdery mist I prefer. Instead, I back off a bit, cutting down on efficiency. The drill, mill and myself did not see eye-to-eye on brew day, more so than usual. The drill/mill bound up, multiple times, making me dump out the grain and clean out any traces before “working” again. Half-dozen times later, I was a bit miffed. I opened the mill spacing to allow for a more coarse grind, alleviating pressure on the drill. 45 minutes after starting the milling process, I was done and hating the mill, drill and anything within eyesight.

I knew my efficiency was shot but I did not change the process I was going to use in terms of the hops. I felt that the way I was going to use the hops, the drop in efficiency shouldn’t raise the bitterness to an obnoxious level.

The changes to the hopping process was threefold:

  • No whirlpool hops. Happy with the aroma this adds but, perception is, not enough flavor. Also, was to be a DIPA to start.
  • Add a first wort hop. It has been a long time but feel this process adds a nice flavor profile to the beer with a minimal impact on bitterness.
  • Add the dry hops towards the end of active fermentation. I have been wanting to use this technique for a while. After my mediocre success with Smiles and Used, I thought that trying this technique might up the perceived aroma (never enough).

The aroma jetting out of the carboy, while racking to the bottling, was impressive. I hope that my milling blunder allows this beer to shine through once I begin tasting. Enjoy!

Recipe for Baller IPA

General Information:
Brew Date: Thursday, October 06, 2016
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S-05, not hydrated
Yeast Starter: none
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.070
IBU: 136.7
Color: 6.3 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 7.6% (due to poor milling)
Primary Fermentation: 10 days @66*F

Grain Bill:
7.00# Maris Otter
7.00# Pilsner
2.00# Munich
8.00 ounces CaraPils
1.00# Table sugar

Mash:
Saccharification @150.8*F

Hop Bill:
3.00 ounce 2014 Simcoe first wort
1.50 ounce 2014 Citra @20 minutes
1.50 ounce 2014 Simcoe @15 minutes
1.50 ounce 2014 Citra @10 minutes
1.50 ounce 2014 Simcoe @5 minutes
4.00 ounce 2014 Citra dry hops 4 days in primary
2.00 ounce 2014 Simcoe dry hops 4 days in primary

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 minutes
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 minutes
30 seconds of pure oxygen after racking to carboy
4 quarts of rice hulls

Updates

  • 2016-10-09: Hard fermentation @67.8*F.
  • 2016-10-10: Slowing fermentation @66.3*F. Added dry hops to primary: 4.00 ounce 2014 Citra, 2.00 ounce 2014 Simcoe.
  • 2016-10-15: Cold condition @39.0*F.
  • 2016-10-16: Bottled with 3.6 ounces of priming sugar and 2.0 cups of water. 28, 22 ounce bottles. Bottle crown label: LN.

Useless Fact: Spain leads the world in cork production.

Brewed: LaLa Barleywine

Sunday, September 4th, 2016
Preparing to add 60 seconds of oxygen to LaLa wort, post boil.

Preparing to add 60 seconds of oxygen to LaLa wort, post boil.

Requests for a new home brew don’t happen often. Heck, even my wife only requests for the same two beers over and over: Honey Pot Pale Ale and Grass Cutter. Maybe that should tell me something about how my home brews are perceived and/or my home brewing abilities.

Nonetheless, a request did come in the shape of my cousin Ron while chatting at this summers’ family reunion. He heard me say “La”. He asked me to say it again, mentioning that it had been a long time since he had heard someone call his Mother “La”. Of course she is my aunt and my Dad’s twin sister. Her real name is Catheline. “La” came about when my Dad was little and did not have the ability to say Catheline. Instead, he could say “La La”. Somehow it stuck. Ever since I am able to remember, we referred to Ron’s mom as Aunt La.

I not going to bore with more family details but let’s just say Aunt La, a damn hip and cool lady, has had a large helping of misfortune in her life. Ronny asked if I could make a beer for the 2nd annual New Year’s day get together, at my house, to honor his Mom. Of course I couldn’t say no, nor did I want to.

Now I had to determine the beer style and recipe that is fitting of Aunt La. A strong beer with the potential for multiple ways (bourbon soaked oak chips, large dry hop and possibly some with a combination of both) of changing the final product seemed to be the best route to go.

In order to brew up a large beer I had to get one more piece of brewing equipment that I have wanted for a long time and has held me back from brewing high gravity beers: pure oxygen. It has been at least a couple of years since I brewed a high gravity beer for the simple reason of my hyper-sensitivity to alcohol flavors in beer. The process of shaking the carboy only has lead me to believe that mine have that off-flavor. I was waiting for a time that I could get the necessary equipment and the wife wouldn’t bat an eye. Paying homage to my Aunt was an easy win.

Researching award winning barleywines and professional clone recipes, I ended up with what is below. The hope is there that everyone will taste and enjoy this beer that is truly created to represent Aunt La in liquid form. Enjoy!

LaLa Barleywine

General Information:
Brew Date: Sunday, September 04, 2016
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S-05 (2), not hydrated
Yeast Starter: none
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.088
IBU: 31.5
Color: 6.4 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 180
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 6.2%
Primary Fermentation: 30 days @68*F, condition at ambient basement temperature for two months

Grain Bill:
10.50# 2 Row
9.50# Pilsner
0.50# Caramel 60L
0.50# Caramel 80L
0.50# Dextrapils

Mash:
Saccharification @150.8*F

Hop Bill:
3.00 ounce 2014 Magnum @90 minutes
1.00 ounce 2015 Cascade @5 minutes

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 minutes
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 minutes
1.0 minute of pure oxygen after racking to carboy

Update(s):

  • 2016-09-04: @1600 the temperature was @83.8*F, placed on concrete basement floor.
  • 2016-09-05: @0800 the temperature was @68*F, pitched yeast
  • 2016-09-05: @2100, fermentation showing good signs.
  • 2016-09-06: @71.3*F, strong fermentation.
  • 2016-09-06: @67.2*F, added heat @69*F.
  • 2016-09-14: Took of heat. Left at ambient basement temperature.

Useless Fact: The $99 Now watch, made by designer Micah Davis, doesn’t have a clock face that tells time, it literally just says “NOW.”

Brewed: Honey Pot Pale Ale – Cascade Wet Hop

Friday, September 2nd, 2016
2016 Cascade hop harvest.

2016 Cascade hop harvest.

I have brewed with home grown hops in the past. I didn’t really care for the finished product, so much so that I didn’t even make an entry into the blog. I recall heaps of vegetal taste that had been extracted into the beer. Unpleasant at best.

That first, and only attempt, I used the hops as late kettle additions: 20, 10 and 1 minute. I wanted to extract cascade flavor and aroma. Unfortunately, I only remember the greenness. That one brew has scared me away from using my home grown hops since.

In the meantime, I have dug up two of the plants (Mt. Hood and Centennial) leaving me with Cascade and Willamette. The two plants I dug up were do to low yield due to poor yard placement. The remaining two have produced okay crops but I have always come up with a reason or three, to the wife and quietly to myself, on why I didn’t have time and/or couldn’t use the hops in a particular season.

This season I noticed that I was getting a good crop of both Cascade and Willamette. I had to do something with those hops. I needed to gain merit with my wife for not wanting to dig up the last two plants. She would replace them with flowers in a heart beat.

What to brew and how to use the hops were my biggest and only questions. Trying to coordinate an optimal time to pick and have time to brew was up there as well.

Countless of hours of thinking about brewing while on one of my two daily walks yielded:

  1. Brew a beer my wife likes: honey pot pale ale.
  2. Incorporate the hops as a whirlpool addition to the wife beer: whirlpool hops.
  3. Need time: Labor day weekend.

I had come up with the perfect plan. Now I only had to perform. Never an issue.

2016 Willamette hop harvest.

2016 Willamette hop harvest.

On brew day, I picked the Cascade and Willamette hops. The amount of Cascade filled a 6 gallon bucket half way. I have no idea how much it weighed but I know it was a shit-ton of hops. The Cascade was full of hop oils and huge on aroma: my hands were green but had the aroma of fresh cascade hops. Better than any crop previously. Knowing that wet hopping with that amount of hops would soak up huge amounts of wort, I decided to not use the Willamette. RIP Willamette. It was discarded. Next year I will plan Labor day weekend as a double brew weekend to use up all the home grown hops. The second beer I would brew: a saison, using the Willamette hops late in the boil and/or as a whirlpool hop.

If the beer tastes half as good as it smelled while brewing, this will be a winner, even with the wife. Enjoy!

Honey Pot Pale Ale

General Information:
Brew Date: Friday, September 02, 2016
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S-05
Yeast Starter: none
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.050
IBU: 31.5
Color: 6.4 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 6.2%
Primary Fermentation: 14 days @68*F

Grain Bill:
6.50# 2 Row
0.50# Caramel 40L
0.50# Honey Malt
2.50# Virginia Orange Blossom Honey

Mash:
Saccharification @150.8*F

Hop Bill:
1.00 ounce 2014 Magnum @60 minutes
1.00 ounce 2015 Cascade @10 minutes

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 minutes
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 minutes

Update(s):

  • 2016-09-03: @0700 the temperature was at 68*F, pitched yeast
  • 2016-09-04: @69*F, fermenting well.
  • 2016-09-06: Fermentation slowing, @67*F, add heat @ 68*F.
  • 2016-09-08: Took of heat. Left at ambient basement temperature.
  • 2016-09-17: Bottled with 3.5 ounces of priming sugar and 2.0 cups of water. 24, 22 ounce bottles. Bottle crown label: HPW.

Useless Fact: Trees “talk” by exchanging chemicals. They communicate through underground fungi, and when they can recognize their relatives, they share nutrients. Basically, tree “families” help each other out.

Brewed: Smiles IPA

Saturday, August 27th, 2016

smiles ipa grain bed

Home brewing brings a smile to my face. It is a great way to relax, taking my mind off my job and other normal life issues. I get consumed by the process. I need to make sure that everything is set before starting, while trying to clean and put away throughout to unsure a neat and clean working space.

Therefore, that should be enough to want to make an India Pale Ale (IPA) named Smiles IPA. I have another and much more important reason. Kaila.

Kaila is my 12 year old daughter that is full of smiles, 24/7. When she greets you, when she tying her shoe or while playing sports, she always has the most friendly and inviting smiles to share with one and all. Her smile is addicting, always helping me through a tough day or even leaving the source of the bad day behind.

She deserved a beer named after her. Smiles IPA was born.

In using Galaxy, Simcoe and Cascade hops, my goal was to capture the essence of how Kaila makes everyone feel; each of these hops has always struck me as a inviting and enjoyable.

I hope I do Kaila justice with this beer. If I do, I will be brewing it again and will have some ready for the day that that 12 turns into a 21. Crap, don’t rush life. Enjoy!

Smiles

General Information:
Brew Date: Saturday, August 27, 2016
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S-04
Yeast Starter: N/A
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.045
Final Gravity: ?
IBU: 43.2
Color: 4.2 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 4.7%
Primary Fermentation: start @66*F

Grain Bill:
9.00# Maris Otter
1.50# Oats

Mash:
Saccharification @152.6*F

Hop Bill:
0.75 ounce Magnum @60 minutes
1.00 ounce Galaxy @5 minutes
1.00 ounce Simcoe @5 minutes
1.00 ounce Cascade @5 minutes
1.00 ounce Galaxy @whirlpool 20 minutes @160*
1.00 ounce Simcoe @whirlpool 20 minutes @160*
1.00 ounce Cascade @whirlpool 20 minutes @160*
2.00 ounce Galaxy @dry hop 4 days
2.00 ounce Simcoe @dry hop 4 days
2.00 ounce Cascade @dry hop 4 days

Extras:
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 minutes
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 minutes
4.0 quarts rice hulls

Updates:

  • 2016-08-28: @62*F, slow start to fermentation.
  • 2016-08-29: @69.1*F, good fermentation.
  • 2016-08-30: @67.8*F, put on heat at 69*F to finish fermentation.
  • 2016-09-03: Took off heat.
  • 2016-09-10: Dry hopped, 3.0 ounces 2014 Galaxy, 2.0 ounces 2014 Simcoe.
  • 2016-09-14: Bottled with 4.0 ounces of priming sugar and 2.0 cups of water. 26, 22 ounce bottles. Bottle crown label: K.
  • 2016-10-16: Tasted.

Useless Fact: If Micheal Phelps were a country, he’d rank no. 35 on the all-time Olympic gold medal list, ahead of 97 other nations.

Tasted: Leaner Saison (c)

Friday, August 26th, 2016

leaner saison c pour

Look: Pours clear. Pale straw to pale gold in color. Half a glass of pristine, white foam. Retention is average; bubbles become quite large. Lacing exists but all falls back to liquid level.

Aroma: A good mix of scents meet the nose. Ripe tropical fruits, light spice with pear and gentle banana, seemingly from the yeast. Light grainy sweetness.

Taste: Spice, sweet grain and yeast characteristics up front. The middle to the end builds the tropical fruit element, lingering into the finish. No real bitterness but lingering pepper.

Drinkability: Medium body. Big carbonation. Crisp. Clean. Dry.

Overall: I don’t why I have gone so long without brewing a saison. Reminds me that it is one of my favorite styles. I have been blinded by the hop. Easy to drink. Will make again.

I might step this one up with a bit more hops: dry hop? I will have to brew saisons on a more regular basis. Enjoy!

Useless Fact: An average person’s yearly fast food intake will contain 12 pubic hairs.

Brewed: Used IPA

Sunday, August 14th, 2016
Year old, 2014, Amarillo hops for the boil and whirlpool.

Year old, 2014, Amarillo hops for the boil and whirlpool.

Sometimes the hardest thing about brew day is coming up with a recipe. This time around I was focused on brewing up a second batch of Three Tooth Joe. The first batch had a fermentation issue: blew the air lock from a crazy ass hard fermentation. After bottling, Three Tooth Joe quickly reared it’s ugly contaminated head. I needed to see if the beer would turn out as good as I expected.

After printing out the recipe, I headed to the basement to check that I had the necessary supplies: malt, hops and yeast. The hop freezer had a cornucopia of 2014 Amarillo hops (sound of turn table needle racing across the record). I love Amarillo. Quick recipe switch to use up the hop residuals.

Three Tooth Joe had a solid base malt IPA recipe. But I wanted to tweak it, it was not needed. I had passed up Vienna malt many times. Vienna to replace Munich. Enough. K.I.S.S.

Now onto the name of the beer: Used. Growing up, I had a next door neighbor that was the same age that I was, school wise. We went to two different schools, making different friends outside of neighborly meetups as supposed friends. Once our worlds expanded, allowing us to go longer distances on our bikes, his friendship to me was that of opportunity. If he had nothing better to do, I was a friend. My parents knew it, they told me, but I didn’t want to hear it. This went on for a year or two before I woke up and moved on to much better friends that I still have today. Looking back to those days I realize that I had been used.

The third day of fermentation found me wandering into the basement to check progress. Floral Amarillo bouquet met the nose, making me thirst for a taste. Enjoy!

Starz

General Information:
Brew Date: Sunday, August 14, 2016
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: Lallemand BRY-97
Yeast Starter: N/A
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.056
Final Gravity: 1.014
IBU: 42.3
Color: 4.5 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 5.51%
Primary Fermentation: start @66*F

Grain Bill:
11.00# Pilsner
1.00# Vienna
8.0oz Oats
4.0oz Crystal 20L

Mash:
Saccharification @151.4*F

Hop Bill:
1.00 ounce Amarillo @20 minutes
1.00 ounce Amarillo @15 minutes
1.00 ounce Amarillo @10 minutes
1.00 ounce Amarillo @5 minutes
4.00 ounce Amarillo @whirlpool 20 minutes @145*
6.00 ounce Amarillo @dry hop 4 days

Extras:
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 minutes
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 minutes

Updates:

  • 2016-08-15: @66*F, slow fermentation.
  • 2016-08-16: @68*F, fermentation taking off.
  • 2016-08-17: @70*F, strong fermentation.
  • 2016-08-18: @71*F, strong fermentation.
  • 2016-08-19: @67*F, raised to 69*F.
  • 2016-08-20: Took off heat.
  • 2016-08-27: Dry hopped, 7.0 ounces 2014 Amarillo.
  • 2016-08-30: Bottled with 4.0 ounces of priming sugar and 2.0 cups of water. 25, 22 ounce bottles. Bottle crown label: USED.
  • 2016-11-10: Tasted Used IPA.

Useless Fact: If you eat a teaspoon of sugar after eating something spicy, it will completely neutralize the heat.

Brewed: Leaner Saison (c)

Saturday, July 2nd, 2016
mosiac hops

Mosiac hops awaiting additions into the boiling wort.

Lately, I have been brewing American Ales, more precisely, India Pale Ales IPA). I have strayed off the IPA beaten path but only to come back as the tractor beam of hop affection pulls undeniably.

At my last visit to the home brew store I was easily persuaded into Lallemand Belle Saison yeast. Prior to that, I had purchased a 10 pound sack of rye. I had used it in Rye IPA earlier this month. I still had a lot left. The combination of the rye on hand, two versions of a rye Saison never brewed, and the slippery tongue of the beer salesmen, I was destined to pick up the saison yeast. The beer store also doubles as a brewery. Salesperson said that they use that yeast in their sasisons. I like there saisons. I don’t have to create a starter if I manage the “size” of the alcohol content. The yeast may sit in the fridge for a week or few months, it is dry yeast. Once again, easy decision.

The only thing left to do: decide on the version of Leaner Saison to brew. Notice that I am using version “c”. I made a third recipe after looking at the first two. Those recipes were made a few years back when I was a bit more subtle in my approach of using rye in a home brewed saisons. It needed more rye: 3 pounds. It needed some new world hops: 3 ounces of Mosaic.

Rye and tropical fruit saison, hopefully, here I come.

Leaner Saison (c)

General Information:
Brew Date: Saturday, July 02, 2016
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: Lallemand Belle Saison
Yeast Starter: N/A
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.060
Final Gravity: 1.002
IBU: 24.6
Color: 4.8 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 6.7%
Primary Fermentation: 2 days @69*F, 2 days @72*F, 3 days @ 74*F

Grain Bill:
10.00# 2-row
3.00# Rye
4.0oz Oats

Mash:
Saccharification @150.1*F

Hop Bill:
1.50 ounce Mosiac @20 minutes
1.50 ounce Mosiac @5 minutes

Extras:
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 minutes
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 minutes

Updates:

  • 2016-07-04: @69*F, on heat to raise to 72*F.
  • 2016-07-04: @72*F, raised to 74*F.
  • 2016-07-04: @64*F, took off heat.
  • 2016-07-17: bottled with 3.2 ounces of priming sugar and 1.6 cups of water. 19, 22 ounce bottles. Bottle crown label: Rye.
  • 2016-07-17: 1 gallon placed on 23 ounces of services berries.
  • 2016-08-26: Tasted.

Useless Fact: 93% of the Great Barrier Reef is now damaged by coral bleaching.

Brewed: Watash

Sunday, May 15th, 2016
Damaged cell phone that finally died.  Nicknamed the terminator since the face/skin was falling off.

Damaged cell phone that finally died. Nicknamed the terminator since the face/skin was falling off. And the reason I didn’t have brewing photos for this home brew day.

Nearly two months has passed since my last home brewing attempt. Finally my schedule opened up, providing me the window I needed to test my craft.

This beer is continuing my emphasis on American pale ales and India pale ales. A year or so I brewed an IPA with 20+ ounces of a combination of Huell Melon and Mandarina Bavaria. The beer was cloudy from the amount of hop trub. I still had three quarters of a pound of hops sitting that needed to be used.

How to use them?

Mandarina Bavaria is the star of the two hops, that’s why there is more left; I used more Huell Melon to balance the first time around. This means that I should get a big kick of tangerine from the Mandarina Bavaria, especially since it is used all late in the boil, whirlpool and dry hop. Chinook was chosen for the dank, pine that it will add. A bit of contrast. Hopefully it works out as planned.

The name: My father affectionately referred to my Mom as “Watash”. My Dad served in the army in the early 50s, around the time of the Korean War, but never officially during the war. My understanding is that Watash was what military used to call each other to mean best buddy during that time. Here’s to my Dad and Mom, best buds. Enjoy!

Watash

General Information:
Brew Date: Sunday, May 15th, 2016
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S05
Yeast Starter: N/A
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.062
Final Gravity: ?
IBU: N/A
Color: 6.2 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 6.6%
Primary Fermentation: 2 days @63*F, 9 days @68*F

Grain Bill:
12.00# 2-row
1.00# Red Wheat
8.0oz Oats
8.0oz CaraPils
8.0oz Caramel 60L

Mash:
Saccharification @154.9*F

Hop Bill:
1.00 ounce Chinook 1st wort
1.85 ounce Huell Melon @10 minutes
1.90 ounce Mandarina Bavaria @5 minutes
1.00 ounce Chinook @whirlpool 20 minutes @160*
1.00 ounce Huell Melon @whirlpool 20 minutes @160*
1.00 ounce Mandarina Bavaria @whirlpool 20 minutes @160*
1.00 ounce Huell Melon @dry hop 6 days
2.00 ounce Mandarina Bavaria @dry hop 6 days
1.00 ounce Huell Melon @dry hop 3 days
2.00 ounce Mandarina Bavaria @dry hop 3 days

Extras:
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 minutes
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 minutes

Updates:

  • 2016-05-16: @62*F, slowly fermenting. on heat as temperature dropped to 61*F.
  • 2016-05-17: @62*F, fermentation stronger but sluggish, adding heat @68*F.
  • 2016-05-23: @67*F, fermentation done, took off heat.
  • 2016-05-29: dry hopped: 2.00 ounces Mandarina Bavaria, 1.00 ounces Huell Melon.
  • 2016-06-02: dry hopped: 2.00 ounces Mandarina Bavaria, 1.00 ounces Huell Melon.
  • 2016-06-05: bottled with 4.0 ounces of priming sugar and 2.0 cups of water. 24, 22 ounce bottles. Bottle crown label: WAT.

Useless Fact: The sound of E.T. walking was made by someone squishing her hands in jelly.

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