Tasted: MaMoo

April 25th, 2017 by scot

MaMoo India pale ale was brewed with Vic Secret to not only try out the hop but because it is supposedly a replacement for Galaxy, which is hard to get and ridiculously expensive when it is available. I don’t want to lead you down the wrong path as Vic Secret is not cheap either. Damn southern hemisphere hops are ridiculously good but at a cost.

I have noticed that I am buying at least a pound of hops per month. At first I thought it was crazy to pick up that much hops but looking at recipes like MaMoo, I am tearing through a pound of hops, give or take, per brew day. Eventually I will have to buy multiple pounds as I will run out.

Look:Gold. Hazy, dirty cloudy. Beautiful inch of white foam covers. Above average retention while lacing is minimal.

Aroma: Hops jump from the bottle on opening, prior to the pour. Once poured, papaya, lime, orange, berry, traces of pine, and earthy. Minimal malt backbone.

Taste: Light malts up front: sweetness. Earthiness is probably the backbone of the hops, while tastes of orange, lime and pine mingle to create a pleasant flavor.

Body: Light-end of medium body. Light/Medium carbonation. Late bitterness but not sharp. Dries.

Overall: Another good beer, just not great. I need a bit more maltiness to my hoppy beers. Might have to up it a notch in the next few batches. Too bland.

Beer is really easy to drink. I was just expecting more from Vic Secret. After rereading the specs for Vic Secret seems like I would have been better off with earlier hop additions. Still the aroma, especially a couple weeks ago, was phenomenal. Beginning to think that north eastern ipas need a bit more malt to make them sexier. Enjoy!

Useless Fact: A single cigarette contains about 4,000 chemicals.

Tasted: For the Little Woman

April 14th, 2017 by scot

Home brewed For the Little Woman enjoyed on the patio.

Tasting day for For the Little Woman. Home brewed almost two months ago, this beer is ready for an official write-up.

Each time I taste a home brew it gives me a chance to reminisce about the process of the brew day, handling, and packaging. For the Little Woman comes across as a easy home brew all the way around:

  • The brew day was rather simple as there was a smallish grain bill and minimal hop additions. There were no special steps. All-in-all nothing to worry about.
  • Handling of the beer was simple as well. Chill, add yeast, temperature control, and let he yeast feast. No extra additions of any kind.
  • Bottling was straight forward as also. No hop trub to cloud the beer or back up bottling gear. Just add to a sanitized bucket on top of the priming sugar liquid.

After I put my brain through the paces, I turn to the cost of brewing this beer to purchasing a similar craft beer. In this case, since it is inspired by Spotted Cow, it is an easy comparison. Spotted Cos is ~$9.00 a six pack, $36.00 a case, which amounts to $72.00+ for the amount of beer I brewed for this batch at retail cost. This beer cost me just under $20 in material cost to brew. Yes, my time is worth money, but it is a hobby. Therefore, if this thing tastes good, it is always the easier winner.

Let’s get started before I rant some more…

Look:Light gold, leaning towards straw. Hazy. Minimal white foam that is quick to leave doubt it ever existed. No lacing as expected from the initaial foam.

Aroma: Straight corn sweetness. Brings back distant memories of creamed corn that was highlighted the dinner table so often as a child. Light grains.

Taste: Follows the nose. Predominately corn sweetness. No sign of hops.

Body: Light body. Light/Medium carbonation. Surprisingly dry. Crisp.

Overall: A nice, light beer. Simple, one noted. Easy to drink. Somewhat lager like. See why so many people find this a cross over beer.

This beer did remind me of Spotted Cow but is definitely not a clone. Very similar with the inspiration coming through. I think there is a need for a few (3 – 5) IBUs to be added for more balance in the finish. Enjoy!

Useless Fact: Astronauts on the International Space Station exercise about 2 hours per day.

Brewed: Black Doug

March 11th, 2017 by scot

If you ever sit around with your friends making a list of movies that you would want on a deserted island, The Hangover is at the top of my list. And, unlike most, I enjoyed all three movies. Black Doug is an American black ale (or cascadian dark ale if you prefer) that pays homage to the Hangover and Mike Epps‘ character sharing the same name.

Black Doug takes inspiration from Wookey Jack by Firestone Walker Brewing Company, one of the smoothest and best black ales available.

The darkness to the beer is obtained by Carafa III, giving color without the astringency of other dark malts. A touch of chocolate rye adds some depth to the beer that can be obtained from the Carafa along.

Still, the question begs: why brew a beer that is more of a fad style? I like a good American black ale and I love hops. I needed some variety to all the east coast ipas that I have been brewing.

Home Brewing For Black Doug

The biggest thing I did to this beer to make it different from other American black ales, I decided to use east coast ipa hopping process: lots of late hops with dry hopping occurring as primary fermentation begins to slow. Otherwise the beer followed a normal brew day. Enjoy!

Recipe for For Black Doug

General Information:
Brew Date: Saturday, March 11, 2017
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S-05, not hydrated
Yeast Starter: none
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.068
Finishing Gravity: 1.014
IBU: 61.4
Color: 28.9 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 7.09%
Primary Fermentation: 10 days @68*F

Grain Bill:
12.00 pounds Maris Otter
2.00 pounds Red Wheat
1.00 pounds Rye
0.56 pounds Carafa III
0.50 pounds Caramel 60L
0.19 pounds Chocolate Rye

Mash:
Saccharification @154.4*F

Hop Bill:
2.00 ounces 2015 Equinox @20 minutes
1.00 ounces 2015 Cascade @10 minutes
1.00 ounces 2015 Citra @5 minutes
2.00 ounces 2015 Cascade @whirlpool for 25 minutes
2.00 ounces 2015 Equinox @whirlpool for 25 minutes
1.00 ounces 2015 Citra @whirlpool for 25 minutes
2.00 ounces 2015 Cascade @4 day dry hop
2.00 ounces 2015 Citra @4 day dry hop
2.00 ounces 2015 Equinox @4 day dry hop

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @15 minutes
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @15 minutes
3.0 quarts of rice hulls
~4.5 gallons of reverse osmosis water used

Updates:

  • 2017-03-12 (morning): @63.0*F, slow fermentation.
  • 2017-03-12 (eveningg): @63.0*F, added heat blanket set to 68*F.
  • 2017-03-13: @66.0*F, hard fermentation.
  • 2017-03-14: Added dry hops.
  • 2017-03-18: Bottled with 3.75 ounces of priming sugar and 2.0 cups of water. 25, 22 ounce bottles. Bottle crown label: BD.

Useless Fact: It would take you 10 years to view all the photos shared on Snapchat in the last hour.

Brewed: MaMoo

March 11th, 2017 by scot

Equinox, Eureka and Vic Secret used in MaMoo.

MaMoo, an American India Pale Ale, pulls inspiration from my mother. My mom has always been a heavy set person. She likes to eat. I have inherited that trait. Since my mom was the only female in the family, she took the brunt of our chiding (there was enough for everyone). We had many nicknames for each other throughout the years. Of course nicknames should typically be based on the person that is receiving the nickname. Due to my mom’s size and shape, the nicknames typically could have been deemed as condescending. But Moo Cow eventually progressed into MaMoo. It rolls of the tongue better.

Some may possibly find it unbelievable that we called my mom, MaMoo, but you had to understand my family and that nicknames were always a part of my youth. I don’t find it condescending. I see it more as a indirect way of saying “I love you.”

My mom was the backbone of the family. She was a throw back mom. She did all the laundry, made dinner, cleaned house, made lunches to bring to school, cleaned up after the dog, gardened and more, all while working full time. She was selfless, always looking out for everyone else, making sure they were happy.

As I have become a parent, I really appreciate the sacrifices she has made. Even more I appreciate the time she likes spending with my kids, playing board games The kids really look forward to visiting with granny to play.

She is one in a million. They don’t make them like my mom anymore. I am thankful that my mom was always there to lend advice (even though I didn’t feel that way at the time). Enjoy!

Recipe for For the MaMoo

General Information:
Brew Date: Saturday, March 11, 2017
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S-05, not hydrated
Yeast Starter: none
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.056
Finishing Gravity: 1.008
IBU: 30.0
Color: 5.5 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 6.30%
Primary Fermentation: 10 days @68*F

Grain Bill:
10.00 pounds Maris Otter
1.50 pounds Oats
0.50 pounds Caramalt

Mash:
Saccharification @150.3*F

Hop Bill:
2.00 ounces 2015 Equinox @5 minutes
1.00 ounces 2015 Eureka @5 minutes
4.00 ounces 2015 Vic Secret @whirlpool for 25 minutes
4.00 ounces 2015 Vic Secret @4 day dry hop

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @15 minutes
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @15 minutes
3.0 quarts of rice hulls
~4.5 gallons of reverse osmosis water used

Updates:

  • 2017-03-12 (morning): @62.4*F, slow fermentation, placed on heat blanket set at 68.0*F.
  • 2017-03-12 (evening): @90.3*F, fantastic fermentation. Thermometer fell off. Removed from heat.
  • 2017-03-13: @66.1*F, hard fermentation.
  • 2017-03-15: Added dry hops.
  • 2017-03-18: Bottled with 3.5 ounces of priming sugar and 2.0 cups of water. 26, 22 ounce bottles. Bottle crown label: Ma.
  • 2017-04-25: Tasted

Useless Fact: 8 billion chickens are consumed in the U.S. each year.

Brewed: For the Little Woman

February 19th, 2017 by scot

For the Little Woman is a home brewed beer with a ton of inspiration from Spotted Cow, by New Glarus Brewing Company; one of my wife’s, Little Woman, favorite craft beers. I home brew two other beers that are mainly hers: Grass Cutter and Honey Pale Ale, but For the Little Woman is the first that was inspired by an actual craft beer.

I couldn’t find a definitive clone recipe for Spotted Cow, even after talking/researching at the local home brew shop. I did gather enough to know what I needed outside of the norm:

  • Flaked corn
  • Custer hops

Base malt, cara-pils, and S-05 yeast are always on hand. Some of the recipes also called for flaked barley. I decided to drop that for a bit more flaked corn. The only concern I have for 12.0 ounces of flaked corn: too much corn, yielding an almost popped corn and/or corn cereal flavor/aroma.

The total of the flaked corn used in this recipe was less than any total of flaked corn and barley combined as well as, there were a couple of recipes approaching this much flaked corn as well. Still concerned. It will be a simple fix if the corn is too strong: use less corn.

Home Brewing For the Little Woman

This is a rather simple beer to brew based on my recipe formulation. Using a single ounce of hops in a beer is something I rarely do and brings back memories of when I was brewing many wild/sour beers.

This was one of the most successful/easy days of home brewing I have had in quite some time. Gravity readings were higher than expected. I think I finally have the grain mill dialed in. Thanks to Fred Francis, at monster mill, for his patience with his assistance. Rich joined in to make the time pass quickly as our conversation centered on craft beer, home brewing, and anything similar. Enjoy!

Recipe for For the Little Woman

General Information:
Brew Date: Sunday, February 19, 2017
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S-05, not hydrated
Yeast Starter: none
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.052
Finishing Gravity: 1.006
IBU: 14.6
Color: 3.1 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 6.04%
Primary Fermentation: 21 days @68*F

Grain Bill:
8.00 pounds 2-Row
0.75 pounds Flaked Corn
0.50 pounds Cara-pils

Mash:
Saccharification @153.3*F

Hop Bill:
0.50 ounces 2016 Cluster @60 minutes
0.50 ounces 2016 Cluster @5 minutes

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @15 minutes
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @15 minutes
3.0 quarts of rice hulls
~4.5 gallons of reverse osmosis water used

Updates:

  • 2017-02-20: @63.5*F, moderate fermentation, placed on heat blanket set at 68.0*F.
  • 2017-02-21: @67.3*F, fantastic fermentation.
  • 2017-02-23: @66.8*F, slow fermentation, placed heat blanket temperature to 70.0*F
  • 2017-03-05: Bottled with 3.5 ounces of priming sugar and 2.0 cups of water. 25, 22 ounce bottles. Bottle crown label: LW.
  • 2017-04-14: Tasted.

Useless Fact: Farts have been clocked at a speed of 10 feet per second (7 mph).

Tasted: Carrot Top

January 24th, 2017 by scot

A small amount of chocolate malt gives this beer a solid amber, almost mahogany color.

Carrot Top took a few weeks bottling condition in order to round out the flavor and aroma. The first taste, a week to ten days in the bottle, made me fret what this beer was going to be. As always patience won out, allowing for this to become more of what I was envisioning when developing the recipe.

Each time I enjoy this beer, I think back to those grade school days, the 70s, and all the other memories of my youth. I wasn’t drinking beer back then, lol, I didn’t care for the aroma of my uncles Buckhorn and I thought I would never be a beer lover. I am sure glad that Samuel Adams found its’ way to my coffers as I couldn’t stand too much more cheap lagers. Nostalgic.

Look:Deep amber, almost brown in color. Half inch of off-white, creamy foam covers. Retention is above average, eventually leaving a thin blanket on top. Lacing it thick and sticky. Good looking in the glass.

Aroma: Papaya, tangerine, citrus, grass and hints of spice are first. Clean sweetness and caramel bring up the malt end.

Taste: Slightly sweet, caramel throughout. Hops are above normal level for an amber but not overbearing. Papaya, citrus, grass and spice carry from the middle to the end. Some bitterness but on the balanced side.

Body: Medium body, almost creamy. Medium carbonation. Dry at the end, in spite of the creamy body.

Overall: A nice beer. Maybe a bit too dry for an amber. Maybe not enough malt profile as well. The hops are solid for the style. Otherwise a solid beer.

I liked the beer but not as much as The Dude. Possibly style difference, lack of reverse osmosis water, or that I feel it needs more malt. If and when I brew this one again, I will would want to change several things: maltier, higher mash temperature, and reverse osmosis water split 50/50 with tap water. Enjoy!

Useless Fact: The seats and curtains in theatres are red because red is the first colour that is lost to our sight in low-light conditions, which thus makes the surroundings seem black and unobtrusive when watching a movie or performance.

Tasted: The Dude

January 22nd, 2017 by scot

The Dude is the first NEIPA (New England India Pale Ale) that I used some reverse osmosis water. It also marks the largest number of different hops, seven, and the first time I used all 2015 hops.

I don’t know if the combination of water profile and fresh(er) hops lead to a solid home brew or the combination of both. I will say, that going forward, I will be using 50% reverse osmosis water or more when making any IPA.

Fresher hops also makes sense. I still have seven pounds of 2015 hops to blow through before I even think about 2016 hops. At the rate of hop usage that will be another 6 – 8 IPAs. My taste buds are waters. Time to get another recipe ready.

Look:Pale gold in color. Covered by full inch of snow white foam; thin but somewhat frothy on top. Great retention, leaving behind immediate and coating lacing before even titling the glass for a sip. Good looking beer in the glass.

Aroma: A light, sweet malt backbone isn’t supposed to be the center of the aroma; it isn’t. Ripe fruits abound: mango, pineapple, apricot, citrus, and pine.

Taste: The taste follows the nose. Big hops and minimal sweet malt backbone. Citrus (orange) and tropical fruits foremost. Hints of grapefruit and pine. Nary much bitterness.

Body: Medium body. Medium carbonation. Dry body.

Overall: One-upped myself as I believe this is the another quality NEIPA. The mix of hops goes well together as well as providing depth of aroma and flavor. Still trending to the high end of the carbonation profile. Might need a bit more body as well,

Used a full breath of hops in this beer. It paid. Peeking at the three week in the bottle range. Need to drink quickly. Someone has to sacrifice. Enjoy!

Useless Fact: Caodaism is a Vietnamese religion that worships Joan of Arc, Shakespeare, and Muhammad.

Brewed: Winter Wheat Ale

January 15th, 2017 by scot

Winter Wheat ale was a quick zigzag when trying to brew up another batch of Grass Cutter wheat ale. In case you haven’t been following along, Grass Cutter wheat ale is a beer that I home brew up for the wife once a year or less.

I haven’t had much time to brew lately. Telling the wife that I would make a beer she likes seemed to be the best way to carve out time from our busy schedule while doing good for others. 😀

I decided on Grass Cutter. Brewing it would have to do without the Saaz hops that I normally use as I was out and a trip to the home brew store wasn’t in the schedule. Not a big deal. Once brew day arrived, I collected up my supplies, including Azacca and Cascade hops. Yes, I know, no where near Saaz. It’s what I had.

Home Brewing Winter Wheat Ale

How did I come up with a new beer? First off, asking that rhetorical question loosely. Secondly, on brew day I was missing coriander as well. Coriander adds more pronounced orange while giving off some pepper notes as well. This is a big change to a beer that usually consider to be an Americanized Belgian Wit.

I had zigged around the hops, now it was time to zag around the missing coriander. Two major changes to a single recipe make for a new recipe, thus Winter Wheat Ale.

I also decided to add the zest at one orange, soaked in vodka, at bottling. I did this in the past with Grass Cutter and it adds a huge orange boost. Cheers to hoping this one turns out somewhat decent. Enjoy!

Recipe for Winter Wheat Ale

General Information:
Brew Date: Sunday, January 15, 2017
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S-05, not hydrated
Yeast Starter: none
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.052
Finishing Gravity: 1.005
IBU: 20.8
Color: 4.0 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 6.17%
Primary Fermentation: 10 days @68*F

Grain Bill:
6.00 pounds 2-Row
3.00 pounds Red Wheat
1.00 pounds Munich

Mash:
Saccharification @150.3*F

Hop Bill:
1.00 ounces 2015 Cascade @20 minutes
1.00 ounces 2015 Azacca @5 minutes

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @15 minutes
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @15 minutes
1.0 tsp Orange peel, bitter @15 minutes
1.0 tsp Orange peel, sweet @15 minutes
1.0 fresh Orange zest (soaked in vodka), @15 minutes
4.0 quarts of rice hulls

Updates

  • 2017-01-29: Bottled with 3.8 ounces of priming sugar and 2.0 cups of water. 28, 22 ounce bottles. Bottle crown label: GC.

Useless Fact: This year (2017), 30-second ads for the Super Bowl will cost around $5.5M.

Brewed: Carrot Top

December 26th, 2016 by scot

Life is full of memories, not always good, not always bad, with many somewhere in-between. One of my memories growing up was the color of my brother’s and my hair. It was bright red, almost orange in color. It was an easy target for kids of my generation to poke fun at; growing up in the 70s it seems like there wasn’t much needed in order to do so and it wasn’t looked down upon.

Red hair sticks out. When it is orange at the beginning of the school year, after a summer of natural summer sun bleaching, the red and blonde hues blend to a bright orange. It almost glowed.

It didn’t take long for a myriad of nicknames to fly our way. Since my brother was older, the nicknames were already in place and known before I showed up at school. “Carrot top” was the one that I remember most. It is the one that, at the time, I think I least liked. But in hindsight, who gives a shit. It is a memory that I will have forever.

As I have grown older, I don’t get the highlights in my hair I used to (tons of skin damage – yuck) and it is turning gray. No one will mistake me for a carrot top but I am one still at heart. This beer is for all those red heads that have found their way on the back side of nickname. Enjoy!

Home Brewing Carrot Top Amber Ale

I have been brewing North East India pale ales (NEIPA) for the past few months (The Dude, The Train Man, Baller, and Used to name a few.). I have been trying to become more intimate with style. I have tried many different hops and changes to the brewing process. It has been quite the tasty experience.

I decided to take some of the NEIPA brewing processes and apply them to an American amber ale. I wanted enough malt to hold up the amber ale while getting a hoppier, non-bitter, aromatic beer. The beer needed to have the mouthfeel to hold up the style but allow clean hop flavors to shine.

Mosiac and centennial seemed to be two well suited hops that should/would play nicely together. Layered crystal malts would lend enough maltiness, sweetness and light caramel notes to remind the drinker of the malt backbone the style was once built upon. A touch of chocolate malt to give color, while oats would add to the body with some creaminess. A mash temperature at 154*F should help the body as well. An American yeast, S-05, should round the beer out nicely.

Excited to have this one in the glass as it sounds like it should be darn tasty.

Recipe for Carrot Top Amber Ale

General Information:
Brew Date: Monday, December 26, 2016
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S-05, not hydrated
Yeast Starter: none
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50
Original Gravity: 1.051
Finishing Gravity: 1.008
IBU: 43.9
Color: 12.7 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 5.64%
Primary Fermentation: 10 days @68*F

Grain Bill:
9.00 pounds 2-Row
0.50 pounds Crystal 40L
0.50 pounds Oats
0.25 pounds Crystal 20L
3.00 ounces Chocolate Malt

Mash:
Saccharification @154.0*F

Hop Bill:
1.00 ounces 2015 Mosiac @1st wort
0.50 ounces 2015 Centennial @15 minutes
0.50 ounces 2015 Mosiac @15 minutes
2.50 ounces 2015 Centennial @0 minutes, 23 minute hop stand
2.50 ounces 2015 Mosiac @0 minutes, 23 minute hop stand
1.00 ounces 2015 Centennial @dry hop 4 days
2.00 ounces 2015 Mosiac @dry hop 4 days

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 minutes
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 minutes
4.0 quarts of rice hulls

Updates

  • 2016-12-27: (morning) Slow fermentation at 62.1*F. Not on heat blanket.
  • 2016-12-27: (evening) Slow fermentation at 62.3*F. Not on heat blanket.
  • 2016-12-28: (morning) Mild fermentation at 62.7*F. Placed on heat at 68*F.
  • 2016-12-28: (evening) Good fermentation at 67.7*F.
  • 2016-12-29: Slow fermentation at 67.5*F.
  • 2016-12-31: Dry hopped.
  • 2017-01-03: Put in freezer at 38*F.
  • 2017-01-04: Bottled with 3.5 ounces of priming sugar and 2.0 cups of water. 27, 22 ounce bottles. Bottle crown label: CT.
  • 2017-01-24: Tasted The Dude.

Useless Fact: US consumers spend about $5 billion a year on Christmas gifts for their pets.

Brewed: The Dude

December 22nd, 2016 by scot

Yes, I always seem to take pictures of the hops I use.

The Dude is a homage to my nine year old son. When he was born, I was on a huge Big Lebowski kick. I couldn’t get enough of the movie. Of course, it was only natural, to bypass his given name and refer to him as Lil’ Dude. I used the nickname so much that family and friends referred to him as Lil’ Dude as well. He was known more by his nickname than his real name.

Now that he is nine, he doesn’t seem so little. He has graduated to just “The Dude”. I enjoy watching him grow up (as I do both of my girls). This beer is named after a fun loving kid that enjoys video games, basketball and playing with friends.

Home Brewing The Dude IPA

Another IPA (seems like a hybrid: APA (American Pale Ale) an IPA (India Pale Ale)).

There were two changes I was going to make to this beer: water and a complex hop profile. I was finally going to use the reverse osmosis system that I received for my birthday in October. My plan was simple: cut the brew day water in half, 50% tap, 50% reverse osmosis. This wasn’t a complex plan or overly thought out. It was somewhat easy. I have tried to read books and forums on water but it seems to bounce of the thick skull instead of soaking in. Therefore KISS: Keep It Simple Stupid.

The second change, complex hop profile, was going to take a bit more thought. Looking up the hop profiles (again and again) helped me to understand the profiles of each hop. Past brewing days and notes also aided in choosing the hops. On hand hops played a role as well.

Eureka and Equinox were definitely going to add quality subtle complexities. Galaxy, Amarillo, Columbus and Mosiac each have big characteristics that add distinct aroma and flavor. Layered the complex nature of the helps should meld well together. Enjoy!

Recipe for The Dude IPA

General Information:
Brew Date: Wednesday, December 22, 2016
Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: S-04, not hydrated
Yeast Starter: none
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.50 (boil finished with 6.0 gallons)
Original Gravity: 1.068
Finishing Gravity: 1.010
IBU: 61.3
Color: 4.3 SRM
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Alcohol by Volume: 7.61%
Primary Fermentation: 10 days @68*F

Grain Bill:
6.50 pounds 2-Row
6.50 pounds Pilsner
2.00 pound Oats

Mash:
Saccharification @153.1*F

Hop Bill:
1.00 ounces 2015 Columbus @1st wort
1.00 ounces 2015 Cascade @10 minutes
1.00 ounces 2015 Columbus @10 minutes
1.00 ounces 2015 Amarillo @0 minutes, 25 minute hop stand
1.00 ounces 2015 Cascade @0 minutes, 25 minute hop stand
1.00 ounces 2015 Columbus @0 minutes, 25 minute hop stand
1.00 ounces 2015 Galaxy @0 minutes, 25 minute hop stand
2.00 ounces 2015 Eureka @dry hop 4 days
2.00 ounces 2015 Galaxy @dry hop 4 days
1.00 ounces 2015 Amarillo @dry hop 4 days
1.00 ounces 2015 Equinox @dry hop 4 days
1.00 ounces 2015 Mosiac @dry hop 4 days

Extras:
1.0 tsp Irish Moss @ 15 minutes
1.0 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 15 minutes
1.0 pound table sugar @ 15 minutes
4.0 quarts of rice hulls

Updates

  • 2016-12-22: Strong fermentation at 69.8*F. Not on heat blanket.
  • 2016-12-24: Blew off bung. Added new bung and dry hops.
  • 2016-12-27: Put in freezer at 38*F.
  • 2016-12-29: Bottled with 3.6 ounces of priming sugar and 2.0 cups of water. 25, 22 ounce bottles. Bottle crown label: D.
  • 2017-01-22: Tasted The Dude.

Useless Fact: US consumers spend about $5 billion a year on Christmas gifts for their pets.

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